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William Dorsey

Thanks for touching on the homoeroticism that lurks murkily in Ford's work. Only Tag Gallagher has really addressed this critically. Of course, Maureen O"Hara brought it up in her memoir, but I got a sense of payback there. I'm not sure homoeroticism is even the right word. Maybe a celebration of androgynous eroticism. You can certainly feel and see it in "The Hurricane" which shows traces of Ford's biggest early influence, Murnau.

Another outstanding piece...Thank You, Biff in Portland

Steve Paradis

This was nearly a thesis for me, and while I was coming up with deep thoughts . . . Frankel's right; if you haven't read the novel, you won't see many of the choices made in the film. The novel's hero is Martin, always Mart; Amos, seen thought his eyes, is dark but not as domineering as Ethan.
But in the movie, he's always Martin, and in moments of female exasperation, Martin Pauley. And i wondered if any of that relates to a man christened John Martin Feeney.
The actual script is not hard to find in facsimile. It starts with the contact information for every member of the cast. In the scene where the rangers discover the dead Comanche, Ethan goes down and takes his scalp. By that is a faint penciled note, in the original: "shoot eyes".

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